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04.04.14Video of the Day: The Recipe for Getting Kids to Do What You Asked (Video)

recipeHow to get students to do what you asked:

1)      Give a clear, concise direction. (What to Do)

2)      Stand where you can clearly see whether they do it. (Radar: “Pastore’s Perch”)

3)      Watch to see whether they do it. (Radar: Scan/swivel)

4)      Use non-verbals actions to make it clear to students that you are watching for their follow through—that you see and care if they do it. (Be Seen Looking Dance Moves)

5)      Recognize them—simply and sincerely with acknowledgment but not praise when they do it.

6)      Get to work learning

So that’s: What To Do + Radar + Be Seen Looking + Acknowledgement + Teaching– a simple and powerful recipe that you can see via video it in action in the able hands of Edward Brooke East Boston’s Rue Ratray here.

1)      Give a clear, concise direction. “Send these back and also take out your notebook.”

2)      Stand where you can clearly see whether they do it. Rue stands in the corner, (a.k.a. Pastore’s Perch) where he can see the classroom more easily (90 degrees of visual field versus 180)

3)      Watch to see whether they do it. Rue scans the room deliberately.

4)      Use non-verbals actions to make it clear to students that you are watching for their follow through—that you see and care if they do it. Rue stands briefly on his tiptoes, and cranes his neck as if to look around an “invisible column” that’s in his way.

5)      Recognize them—simply and sincerely with acknowledgment but not praise when they do it. “Jasmine’s ready; D.T. is ready”

6)      Get to work learning.

Yes, there are difficult students who will need a bit more than this. But this recipe will help ensure the follow through of the ‘great middle.’ You may be surprised at how large the great middle is or how much faster your willing students will be when you show you’re looking.  And if necessary, you can then start to deal with your “non-compliers’ … though now, hopefully, there will be fewer of them.

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2 Responses to “Video of the Day: The Recipe for Getting Kids to Do What You Asked (Video)”

  1. Rue Ratray
    April 7, 2014 at 10:44 am

    Laura Mahajan taught me all this, among a million other things.

  2. Kori
    August 7, 2015 at 3:13 pm

    Rue clearly uses explicit instructions and the students follow them with no problem. This is a great example of good classroom management.

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