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Doug Lemov's field notes

Reflections on teaching, literacy, coaching, and practice.

05.18.18 Amazing Source of Five-Plagues Aligned Texts

We’re in Albany today with 150 amazing folks at our Reading Reconsidered workshop. Earlier this morning we discussed the five plagues of the developing reader–five common challenges that make complex text difficult for students and that are not captured by quantitative measures of text complexity such as Lexiles. We discussed the example of Lord of the…


05.04.18 We Are Writing a Language Arts Curriculum!

  This is kind of an exciting announcement. Maybe a scary one too. My team and I have decided to write a Language Arts (i.e. English) Curriculum.  We’re going to start with the middle grades (4-8) and expand from there. With a little luck we hope to have it ready for schools to use a year…


12.14.17 An Excerpt from Chapter 1 of Reading Reconsidered

Over the next couple of months, I’m going to be posting some excerpts from Reading Reconsidered here on Field Notes.  This is the beginning of Chapter 1, which discusses Text Selection and Text Complexity. Chapter 1: Text Selection One of the most important topics in teaching reading is text selection, the process by which teachers choose…


12.10.17 An Excerpt from Chapter Five of Reading Reconsidered

Over the next couple of months, I’m going to be posting some excerpts from Reading Reconsidered here on Field Notes.  This is the beginning of Chapter 5, which discusses how and how much students read. Reading Reconsidered: Chapter 5 Approaches to Reading: Reading More, Reading Better Consider, for a moment, how much reading you were required…


03.02.17 Pairing Reading Reconsidered Techniques with Cognitive Science, Part II—A Guest Post from Ben Rogers

This is the second of a pair of posts by Ben Rogers of Norwich Primary Academy (NPA) in Norwich, England. In his first post, Ben described the tools he and his colleagues have been using from Reading Reconsidered and cognitive science to bolster students’ reading and writing skills. In this post, he reflects on the power of intentionally building students’ background knowledge and vocabulary. By the way, we…