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Doug Lemov's field notes

Reflections on teaching, literacy, coaching, and practice.
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Teach Like a Champion 2.0 is now available! Learn more about the new edition here.

03.26.15 Meet Tom Bennett; Attend researchED (or vice versa)

Tom Bennett is a high school teacher in London, the writer of four teacher training books, a columnist for the TES Magazine, a long-list nominee for the 2015 Global Teacher Prize and a member of the expert group reviewing Initial Teacher Training (ITT) for the UK Government. He writes brilliant stuff like this recent piece on…


03.24.15 Clip of the Week: Megan Broome Makes Her Routines Academic

Last week, 180 teachers and leaders from charter, district and even a few private schools located everywhere from California to Oklahoma to Florida (not to mention Singapore and Chile) joined us for our Behavior and Culture workshop here in Albany. As always, we left with tons of takeaways about great teaching gleaned from participants. We talked…


03.23.15 When a Pre-Call Killed the Mojo- And What to do About it

Recently, our team sat down together to watch footage of a first rate elementary teacher leading a math lesson with her second grade scholars. We observed a lot of great things–and one very unexpected outcome.  Joaquin Hernandez and Colleen Driggs describe it in this guest post: After giving students a few minutes to solve a word problem,…


03.18.15 Letter from New Orleans: Teach Like a Champion for Peer Tutors

A couple of weeks ago I got an email from Evan Stoudt, Freshman Dean and Algebra teacher at Sci Academy in New Orleans–one of my favorite schools.  I find them especially reflective about how to combine real college prep academic rigor with loving attention to the in-school (and often out-of-school) lives of their students.  Evan mentioned…


03.12.15 When (Especially) to ‘Reject Self-Report’

Technique #1 in the new Teach Like a Champion 2.0 is “Reject Self Report.”  The idea being that we should listen for the moments when, having just taught something or explained a task, we ask students questions like:  “Everybody understand?” or “Everyone got it?” These questions, we should realize, are functionally rhetorical. There is only one…