You are here: Home / Blog

Doug Lemov's field notes

Reflections on teaching, literacy, coaching, and practice.

10.20.17 How Eric Snider Rolls Out His Discussion Procedures

  We’ve been watching a lot of footage of the first weeks of school lately- observing how top teachers set expectations and install systems that they’ll use throughout the year.  We recently watched a clip of Achievement First Bushwick Middle School’s Eric Snider teaching his students to have productive discussions. My colleague Maggie Johnson loved it…


10.06.17 Cold Call for Coaches: Atlanta United’s Mike Lynch Dials It In

  The benefits of using Cold Call in the classroom are pretty clear. It helps ensure that students are always mentally ‘on’ during a lesson and it allows teachers to question quickly and efficiently, especially to make sure that students know what they need to know–to Check for Understanding. These ideas are critical in a coaching…


10.06.17 Using the Do Now for Retrieval Practice–An Update from Alex Laney

  A year or so ago I wrote a post about Alex Laney’s Do Nows at Smith’s Wood Academy in Birmingham, England.  Since then Alex has kept in touch and he recently shared some insights about the school’s new approach to Do Nows or (as they call them) DNAs. Most notably, given the very compelling research…


10.05.17 Ulrich Boser: Why Learning Less Sometimes Means Learning More

Ulrich Boser’s new book Learn Better is a kind of Yin to Teach Like a Champion’s Yang.  Like TLAC it attempts to study what goes right when learning is successful. And like a lot of the writing my team and I do on this blog, it draws on the findings of cognitive science.  But Learn Better…


10.03.17 Retrieval Practice: A Teachers’ Definition and Video Examples

  We’ve been reading up a lot on retrieval practice lately.  Hopefully we’re not alone in that. From a cognitive science standpoint it’s absolutely central to improving learning. You might recall  Daniel Willingham’s assertion about the importance of knowledge: Data from the last thirty years lead to a conclusion that is not scientifically challengeable: thinking well…